Tacoma

The Venturis Corporation wants their AI back. That’s where you come in.



Tacoma is a narrative adventure set aboard a high-tech space station in the year 2088. As you go about your mission, you’ll explore every detail of how the station’s crew lived and worked, finding the clues that add up to a gripping story of trust, fear, and resolve in the face of disaster.
At the heart of Tacoma is the facility’s digital surveillance system, which has captured 3D recordings of pivotal moments in the crew’s life on the station. As you explore, echoes of these captured moments surround you. You’ll use your ability to rewind, fast-forward, and move through the physical space of these complex, interwoven scenes to examine events from every angle, reconstructing the multi-layered narrative as you explore.
Tacoma is the next game from the creators of Gone Home, and carries on that tradition of detailed, immersive, and powerful storytelling, while pulling players deeper into the narrative than ever before.
Now featuring over two hours of Developer Audio Commentary! Just start a new game with Commentary enabled, or toggle it on in the Gameplay options.

Features:

A Richly Layered Story Experience:

Six crewmembers lived and worked on space station Tacoma, forming relationships, experiencing love and loss, and facing crisis together. Discover not just what happened to these people, but what makes them who they are, through your role as an interactive investigator. The story is told through a series of fully voiced and animated interactive AR scenes, immersing you in the events on Tacoma.

A Groundbreaking Multi-Path Story System:

In each section of the station, you are surrounded by digital representations of crewmembers following their own parallel story threads that diverge, recombine, and split off again. Rewind, fast-forward, and move through these scenes’ chronologies as they swirl around you. Your interactive tools allow you to discover the tightly-knotted narrative from every angle, and in every detail.

A Deeply Interactive Gameworld:

Explore Tacoma Station both physically and digitally. Unlock doors and drawers to find meaningful objects, notes, and physical artifacts, while simultaneously exploring extensive records of the crew’s digital communications and personal thoughts. Every facet of the crew’s experience on Tacoma is part of your investigation.

A Vision of the Future:

Experience life in the year 2088. Discover a rich fictional universe that depicts humanity’s expansion into low-Earth orbit and beyond. A deeply-imagined speculative vision of the near future from the award-winning story team behind Gone Home and BioShock 2: Minerva’s Den.

A Compact Narrative Game:

Tacoma is estimated to take around 2 to 5 hours to complete. How deep you dig and how much detail you find is up to you. Tacoma is a non-combat, non-puzzle-focused game. The details of the story and gameworld are there for you to discover at your own pace.

Developer Commentary Mode!

Tacoma now includes over two hours of Audio Commentary from the writers, designers, programmers, artists and more who worked to bring the world of Tacoma to life. Learn secrets about Tacoma's fictional world, insight into the game development process, and personal stories from the people behind the game.
Minimum Requirements
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7 or higher, 64-bit
Processor: 1.9ghz Intel i5-equivalent processor or higher
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: Onboard or dedicated graphics accelerator with 1GB+ of video RAM
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 11 GB available space
Recommended Specifications
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7 or higher, 64-bit
Processor: 2.9ghz Intel i7-equivalent processor or higher
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: Dedicated graphics accelerator with 2GB+ of dedicated video RAM
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 11 GB available space
Additional Notes: Runs best installed on a SSD
Minimum Requirements
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: OS X 10.9 or higher
Processor: 1.9ghz processor or higher
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: Onboard or dedicated graphics accelerator with 1GB+ of video RAM
Storage: 11 GB available space
Recommended Specifications
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Most recent version of OS X
Processor: 2.9ghz Intel i7-equivalent processor or higher
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: Dedicated graphics accelerator with 2GB+ of dedicated video RAM
Storage: 11 GB available space
Additional Notes: Runs best installed on a SSD
Minimum Requirements
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: 64-bit OS
Processor: 1.6ghz Intel i5-equivalent processor or higher
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: Onboard or dedicated graphics accelerator with 1GB+ of video RAM
Storage: 11 GB available space
Recommended Specifications
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Ubuntu 16.04
Processor: 2.9ghz Intel i7-equivalent processor or higher
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: Dedicated graphics accelerator with 2GB+ of dedicated video RAM
Storage: 11 GB available space
Additional Notes: Runs best installed on a SSD
  • If you want a great story told well, that will last an afternoon, then get Tacoma. It knows what it wants to be, and it does that perfectly.

  • If you're a big believer in great storytelling in video games, Fullbright has once again nailed it, proving it can be done, and it can be done to the highest standard.

  • A bold, ambitious step forward for the - hnngh - "walking simulator." [Issue#266, p.54]

  • games(TM)

    A stunning interactive storytelling experience. [Issue#190, p.76]

  • A refreshing genre piece, which plays on expectations to explore the humanity of its cast.

  • Tacoma isn't for everyone. Though short, it's meditative and methodical. It's a game for the quiet explorer and the empathetic. There's no major action or combat, no perplexing puzzles or fail states. Instead, Tacoma gives players a masterfully crafted setting and encourages them to find out what made the people who once called it home tick. Life, even among the stars, can be mundane and familiar but Tacoma's presentation is nothing short of spectacular.

  • Tacoma may only be about 3 hours long, but it fills that time beautifully, telling a thoughtful, poignant tale told through the magic of science fiction. Come for the space, stay for the heart. And the space basketball.

  • Though short, Tacoma is a great narrative adventure, especially for fans of sci-fi.

  • Tacoma is a captivating tale that messes with established tropes in a way that Fullbright might become known for. Although it spins its wheels at the start, this slow and methodical journey through the lives of a small group survivors is one with some fantastic twists and turns, and one that should stick with you long after its conclusion.

  • Although Tacoma has a less emotive story than Gone Home The Fullbright Company has created a very interesting game. Their approach to humans relations is one of the best in the medium.

  • Tacoma successfully overcomes the challenge of featuring eight characters and making them all interesting in a relatively short game. Using the out-of-sequence AR recordings to learn about the exciting events on Tacoma is a unique way to see every side of a conversation, and it’s one I hope to see catch on. I would have appreciated more time and events that'd have given me a reason to explore more of the beautiful station, but the time I did have in this fascinating hypothetical future was great.

  • Tacoma might not quite manage to live up to the unrealistically lofty expectations left behind by Fullbright’s full game, but it’s still neat proof that the American studio knows how to tell a good story, and that the medium of games is far from exhausted when it comes to new ideas about how to weave an interesting interactive tale.

  • A smart and thoughtful science fiction mystery featuring a cast of believable, nuanced characters.

  • With Tacoma’s unique take on branching narratives and a strong cast, it manages to tell an intriguing tale about mortality and relationships in the face of catastrophe. Tacoma builds on the foundations of Gone Home, but has its own unique tricks to tell an immersive story in a compelling way.

  • Tacoma is a great narrative-driven game that puts you in the middle of a mysterious space station. From the creators of Gone Home, this is a sci-fi experience that you should check out.

  • Tacoma is a good adventure and a great narrative-focused game. We think it won't make the same impact as Gone Home did, but if you like this type of game, you shouldn't miss it.

  • In spite of its high price and short duration, it is a narrative experience more than recommended for all the lovers of the genre and those who enjoyed the previous title from Fullbright: Gone Home.

  • Tacoma is a beautifully told story filled with real characters and real emotion that you won’t be able to put down until you’ve experienced it in full.

  • The fate of astronauts from the damaged space ship takes one’s breath. Adventure excels with a A-quality plot and an idea with holographic memories is just excellent. It´s a pity the playing time is so short and the environment is poor.

  • Quotation forthcoming.

  • Tacoma’s facade floats between charming futurism and abrasive, old-fashioned avarice. This may seem like inhospitable space to explore the depths of benevolence, but the power of identity and humanity are alive and well supported inside of Tacoma’s twirling science fiction architecture.

  • If you’re in the market for a fascinating narrative and an intriguing space station to lose yourself in, you could do a heck of a lot worse than Tacoma.

  • Fullbright brings a fascinating hypotetical future, featuring eight characters and making them all interesting in a short time.

  • Tacoma gives the player space to get to know its characters, and really know them deeply, which is why its moments of melodrama become so much more compelling than anything else we’ve seen in the gaming medium. It is indeed short, I will concede that, and it is not open even by walking simulator standards, but what Fullbright has delivered is rich, affecting storytelling that’s truly worth experiencing.

  • The story, the characters and the dialogue of Tacoma demonstrate Fullbright's evolution. The interaction system and the complete control over the story is interesting, though the mid-sections are dull and boring.

  • Tacoma doesn’t match the excellence of Gone Home in the story department, but nonetheless manages to provide a quick yet engaging adventure. The central mechanic of being able to listen in to several different discussions from a variety of different directions and perspectives makes for something incredibly fun to play with and helps provide insight into a (somewhat literally) colorful cast of memorable characters. It’s an impressive little spacewalk.

  • Tacoma is not for everyone. Even if you like this sort of game, we should warn you that it lasts only about 5 hours. Now, as brief as it is, the experience is also pretty satisfying. You will hardly find any good reason to play it more than once but if you are willing to commit with the story, you will surely enjoy it.

  • Much like Everybody's Gone to the Rapture, Tacoma captures the player's attention from the beginning to the end, thanks to an intense story, a strong personality and a gameplay tightly connected to the sci-fi setting. It's a pretty short experience, but definitely worth your time, at least if you love a good sci-fi story.

  • While some of its threads don't always come together as neatly as they should, Fullbright's sophomore effort is a quiet and haunting examination of the ways corporations dehumanize us all.

  • It’s what you’d expect from the people who made Gone Home, but that’s no bad thing.

  • Tacoma is a quiet, lovely, yet slightly melancholy exploration of humanity struggling in a corporate vacuum, and one that proves Fullbright still has an eye for detail.

  • Tacoma offers an interesting insight into six crew members that spend a year on a space station together. Gone Home was more engaging, but the special way of telling this story about six deep characters is definitely worth your time.

  • The exploration of this detailed and living space station is impressive. But it lacks depth in terms of storytelling as well as core mechanics.

  • Tacoma is a great narrative-driven game.

  • The romantic plot had a real chance to flourish and grow organically and its conclusion is one of the most satisfying I’ve ever had the pleasure of enjoying. I wish I could say the same thing about Tacoma.

  • Tacoma is a playable science fiction movie with exciting ideas, but gameplay and emotions are lacking.

  • The puzzles and the forward and rewinding function have been implemented too half-heartedly, for which the action ends too often in predictable and unconstrained paths.

  • The lean gameplay and mechanics don’t gel with the unfocused narrative, and it’s a singular flaw that Tacoma can’t overcome. There’s plenty to like in the game, but it struggles to find a cohesive theme that brings the experience together.

  • Edge Magazine

    It is wonderfully written, its world lived-in and vivid. It meets our expectations of a Fullbright game, but sadly leaves it at that. [Issue#310, p.114]

  • Meticulous attention to detail makes even the most mundane things, like a forgotten book in a corner or a bottle of shampoo, captivating, and strong voice acting and writing gives surprising depth to characters who are physically absent from the story itself. But its two levels never really intersect in meaningful ways, culminating in an ending that's thought-provoking but short of being revelatory.

  • This space version of Gone Home isn't astonishing like the predecessor. The story is compelling but too compressed, and the graphics are sloppy. We'd expected something deeper from Fullbright's second game.

  • Fullbright has crafted an impressive yet ultimately unfulfilling narrative adventure in Tacoma. Its characters and setting are some of the best in the medium in terms of dialogue and atmosphere, but the overarching plot is far too weak to hold them altogether. That being said, exploring the lonely space station is a journey I don’t regret taking.

  • Tacoma is a rightful heir to Gone Home. Exploration of the station, with the possibility to learn about the crew through holographic projections, makes us feel we are in a very lively place and the main story, that wants us to think about capitalism and I.A.'s future is captivating, even thought the experience is quite short.

  • I liked Tacoma though, even with its fumbles. I felt more engaged watching (and rewinding, pausing, fast-forwarding) how things played out than I had in a lot of games like it. That's likely because it's the rare game where the player is in direct control of what, when, and how they see everything.

  • Tacoma has some great characterisation and is a very different breed of science fiction, but my enjoyment was sapped by one key mistake in how the story was told. It also has issues with loading and can be somewhat bland to look at, but looking around you, the environmental storytelling is top-notch. By the end, I’d become invested in these characters, but not necessarily their plight.

  • After only two hours the mystery about Tacoma is solved, but the personal stories about the crew members definitely stick. The story might not be as brilliant as Gone Home's, the original way of storytelling is excellent.

  • The story is built out of the playback mechanic, which gives birth to the subtler suggestions of what’s really going on with this station. But the playback system means there’s a lot of talking to listen to, and a lot of wireframes to stare at. For a game about an abandoned space station, Tacoma gave me plenty of company. But the moments where I had to reckon with being alone in space were the ones that stuck with me.

  • Tacoma domesticates the space adventure by making its characters and setting all-important. The plot does contain a couple of twists, but the revelations are more of the “ah” then the “ah-ha!” sort.

  • Tacoma is a master class in interactive character work, in the art of giving you the tools to experience a fascinating place through others’ eyes.

  • Tacoma lays the foundation for a truly great story, but a short length and some unexplored ideas leave it feeling lacking. I loved the characters I met over the course of the story and there are some standouts. ODIN, voiced by Justice League Unlimited alum Carl Lumbly, is particularly a treat. But by the end, I was hoping for just a little more from them, as well as more from the whole concept as a whole.

  • This fuzziness at the game’s heart makes you wonder what magic Fullbright could work with its eye for detail worked into a meatier tale. As it is, Tacoma drifts towards ennui more than you would hope, especially given its familiar setting. But what a setting it can be; rich craft and detailed stories worked into every corner, device and discarded piece of paper. Despite some misgivings, a trip to Tacoma is still one worth taking.

  • Tacoma's top-notch story and presentation are arranged into an inappropriate structure that will dull the experience, even for fans of exploration games.

  • Metro GameCentral

    A disappointing follow-up to Gone Home that tells a less interesting and less focused tale, while failing to advance the art of interactive storytelling.

  • CD-Action

    Gone Home developers tackle the issue of corporate hell aboard futuristic space station. Unfortunately their sentimental style does not go along with the brutally down-to-earth (oh, the irony!) subject too well. [10/2017, p.67]

  • Walking simulators live or die by the strength of their narrative, and Tacoma gives away its main plot just minutes after you start playing it. It does have other secrets, but they aren’t worth your time.

  • Sadly, Tacoma, the new game from the creators of Gone Home, is not the best example of interactive storytelling.

Tacoma
$19.99 $10.00
Title: Tacoma
Genre: Adventure, Indie
Released: 1 August 2017
Developer: Fullbright
Publisher: Fullbright
  • Single-player
  • Steam Achievements
  • Steam Cloud
  • Steam Trading Cards
  • Full controller support
UI Audio Subs
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